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Glass

During the past half century, the studio glass movement of the 1960s has bridged the gap between individual artists and craftsmen making one-of-a-kind sculptures to creating handmade functional glass objects. This melding of personal expression with the business of being a working artist has led to the exponential growth in private, artist-owned studios, community studios, and glass programs in universities including our BFA degree program at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

As a student in the Glass department, you will learn four main methodologies:

  • Working hot glass which comprises glass blowing and off hand, molten glass processes
  • Working glass cold including cutting, fabricating, grinding, sandblasting, and polishing
  • Fusion processes such as casting, slumping, and bending
  • Flame working

After you survey all basic methods during your introductory classes, you will explore various techniques and concepts before performing your own independent study and research individually tailored to your developing voice. You will do all of this under the guidance of our devoted Glass professors, whose commitment to the art form has earned them international recognition as leading contributors to the medium.

What can I do with a degree in Glass?

  • Studio Artist & Lighting Designer
  • Glass artist
  • Founder, Artisan Glassware Company
  • Fabricator, Glass Company Founder
  • Glass Assistant
  • Founder, Heather Moore Jewelry

Facilities

At the Cleveland Institute of Art, we have one of the best-equipped undergraduate glass studios in the country and each Glass student has his or her own individual studio space. Developing a sense of community and collaboration is an important aspect of the program. So our student-run facility promotes teamwork and teaches the responsibilities of everyday glass studio operation. The well-ventilated, three-station hot glass area features furnaces for melting clear and colored glasses, benches and tools for working glass hot, and large annealing ovens. An adjacent area holds more computer-controlled ovens for casting, slumping and special forming projects. The cold glass facility is furnished with great lighting, diamond saws, lapping wheels, German and Czech engraving/cutting lathes, polishing lathes, and assorted hand tools for grinding and polishing. Lampworking also has a designated space to complement the other complex glass-working processes.

CIA also houses the fabrication studios, a shared space, staffed and supervised by highly qualified technical specialists. Students from all courses of study are encouraged to use this space and do hands-on research with tools and materials. This communal environment gives students optimal means of making for their individual exploration and group projects.

A premier college of art and design.
11610 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland OH 44106 USA
800.223.4700

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